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Maintaining a strong speaking voice (for announcers) (1 Viewer)

Mike

Nitro Member
At the end of a full weekend of announcing, I have to imagine the voice of anyone who has called races for multiple days wants to say "no mas."

Just curious what strategies/tricks for stamina announcers use to keep their voice strong during a full racing weekend.
 

none

Nitro Member
Micheal,

Probably the most important thing is practice. The vocal cords are muscles and like any other muscle, when you use them they get stronger, and if you over use them, they can get strained. Just as a marathon runner practices by running shorter distances and builds up to 26 miles 385 yards, or a weight lifter starts lighter and works up to heavier, an announcer can start with a couple of hours and work up to a full weekend.

Another thing that can be VERY helpful is a good headset or set of earbuds and turn them up. If you are loud in your own ears, it will keep you from shouting and wearing out your voice. Let the amplifiers make it loud outside, you don't have to yell. (Although some announcers do). People used to pick up my headset and wince at how loud it was, but it was a big help getting through a long weekend.

Hope that's helpful.
You can send me a DM if you want more specifics.

Alan
 
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mgty3whlr

Nitro Member
Sure, When there is excitement on the track, the announcer will pick it up a notch with their voice. Practice, Practice, Practice. Sure, You're voice will be worn out by the end of the day or weekend.
 

Jim

Nitro Member
Micheal,

). People used to pick up my headset and wince at how loud it was, but it was a big help getting through a long weekend.

Alan

I enjoy your work Alan but, don't you worry about hearing loss? or is that just a hazard of being around noisy cars?
 

Randy

Nitro Member
Regarding exercising the vocal cords, Alan's next door neighbor posted this YouTube video in response to him leaving his bathroom window open while showering in the morning. She said she learned everything she knows by listening, and said she actually tried to sell her house and move, but the seller's disclosure statements killed the deal.

 

[email protected]

Nitro Member
In my case Michael, depending on the show I call, it is about pacing my self. For example, in early January, the track I announce at, Talladega Short Track's Ice Bowl, it is a 4-day marathon. Thursday is practice for all our divisions. I try to keep an even tone and delivery knowing there is so much racing left with anywhere from 300 to 375 cars on hand. Practice is from around 10:00am till 6:00pm.

Friday it get's very, very busy. As we practice all divisions from 10:00am till 4:45pm. dang near 6 hours of calling classes and describing the cars and drivers and making announcements. Then after that we get busy with 1 class having qualifying heats races. All the while trying to pace myself, ain't easy some times. We finish up around 6:30. So from around 1 hour before practice begins until we end, I have been in the announcing booth talking for 9 hours, day 2 in the can.

Saturday it get's very hard core. On the mic at 9:00am again, practice for all but 1 division, then we time trial 6 divisions to set the heat races, around 275 cars I will call for qualifying...…..then we have qualifying heats races to set Sundays line-up, usually around 24+ races I call, trying to make it exciting and entertaining AND saving my voice. We will wrap up day 3 around 7:00pm. 10 hours announcing, straight.

Sunday it's Championship day. We start at noon and run B-Mains for the 6 divisions, around 18 races, then it is time for the Main events that start around 3. This is where pacing pays off, we finish up around 7 ish, I started the day at 11:00am going on the air. Another 8 hours in the booth. That is a lot of talking.


When it comes to a regular show it is much easier as we run the most efficient show in all of Alabama. I go live at 6:00pm. We hot lap at 7:00pm. Time trial the Super Late Models at 7:45pm. then start our qualifying heat races right at 8:00pm Features usually start at 9 to 9:15 and we wrap it up at 10:00 to 10:30 normally.

I can tell if I am getting to loud or vocal as I can feel it in my throat. Sugar drinks are a no-no as well as energy drinks, not good for my cords. Ice water or good ole coffee is best. Not yelling is also key. Most folks tell me I have a face for radio and a voice for announcing,lol. Some say a distinctive voice.

[email protected]
Talladega Short Track Announcer
 

T.Smith

Nitro Member
Micheal,

Probably the most important thing is practice. The vocal cords are muscles and like any other muscle, when you use them they get stronger, and if you over use them, they can get strained. Just as a marathon runner practices by running shorter distances and builds up to 26 miles 385 yards, or a weight lifter starts lighter and works up to heavier, an announcer can start with a couple of hours and work up to a full weekend.

Another thing that can be VERY helpful is a good headset or set of earbuds and turn them up. If you are loud in your own ears, it will keep you from shouting and wearing out your voice. Let the amplifiers make it loud outside, you don't have to yell. (Although some announcers do). People used to pick up my headset and wince at how loud it was, but it was a big help getting through a long weekend.

Hope that's helpful.
You can send me a DM if you want more specifics.

Alan
Did you do a day at the Las Vegas regional last year all by yourself? I had it on all day at the house and I can't remember anyone else getting on the mic.
 

Sean D, shondoo

Nitro Member
The late Brian Olson told me sword swallowing like in the circus and gargling with razor blades did the trick. But that was Brian, a one of a kind whom I dearly miss.
You got that right, Bobby. He lived about 15 minutes away from me the next town to the East. I started working at the local dragstrip (Bunker Hill) when I was 15 years old, hand-writing E.T. slips in the shack at the end of the track while he was on the mic. The next year I got to run the tree (from inside the tower back then), so we worked side-by-side for a handful of seasons. He and his crew painted a couple of our cars and we became good friends over the years. Definitely miss that guy......

Sean D
 
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